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NILE Webinar: HPV Immunization is a Job for Pediatric Providers

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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 04/22/2014 - 12:46
NILE Webinar: HPV Immunization is a Job for Pediatric Providers
04.22.2014 | CME

Join Immunize Nevada for a one-hour presentation on strategies for discussing HPV immunization with parents, healthcare providers, community members, and policy leaders.  An update on the status of HPV immunization in the United States and Nevada will be given, and an outline of why a risk-based immunization strategy fails to protect patients.  Further discussion will include the rationale behind the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendations for universal immunization of males and females at age 11 to 12 and the importance of a strong provider recommendation.

Learning Objectives Include:

  1. Provide a status update on HPV vaccine implementation in the United States and in the state of Nevada.
  2. Give reasons for avoiding a risk-based strategy for HPV immunization.
  3. Provide the rationale behind the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ recommendations for universal immunization of males and females at ages 11 to 12.
  4. Articulate strategies for discussing HPV immunization with parents, other healthcare providers, community members, and policy leaders.
REGISTER HERE

This webinar is eligible for 1 CEU credit in nursing or pharmacy.

Featured Presenter: Kenneth Alexander, M.D., Ph.D
Dr. Alexander is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and head of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Chicago.   His research interests of HPV include transcription and replication control, innate immune responses to infections, antiviral therapy, and promotion of immunization in medically underserved communities.  He has been published in various scientific journals, including Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal and Journal of Virology.
After earning his degrees at the University of Washington, School of Medicine, in Seattle, WA, he completed a residency program at Children's Hospital in Boston, MA. While training for his board certification in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Duke University Medical Center, he studied papillomaviruses and later joined the faculty at Duke University.  Dr. Alexander has a wife and two young adult daughters.